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Mayor Purzycki Invites Citizens to Celebrate National Bike Month by Biking to Work and Attending the 13th Annual Wilmington Grand Prix

Post Date:05/16/2019 4:00 PM

Activities include National Bike-to-Work Day tomorrow and the Grand Reopening of the Urban Bike Project on Saturday 

  wilm grand prix 2019

Mayor Mike Purzycki today encouraged citizens to celebrate National Bike Month in Wilmington, which kicks off with National Bike-to-Work Day tomorrow, Friday, May 17, and continues with this weekend’s 13th Annual Wilmington Grand Prix, held Friday, May 17 through Sunday, May 19. Also this weekend, the Urban Bike Project, Wilmington’s non-profit community bike shop, located at 1500 North Walnut Street, will celebrate its Grand Reopening following recent renovations.
 
One of the premier criterium-style bike races in the country (i.e., a bike race of a specified number of laps held on a closed course of public roads), the Wilmington Grand Prix is recognized as part of USA Cycling’s National Race Calendar for the 12th straight year. Last year’s race drew riders from 21 states and seven countries. “We are thrilled to welcome back the Wilmington Grand Prix,” said Mayor Purzycki, “which since 2012 has generated nearly $4 million in economic benefits for our local economy.”
 
“Cycling is an affordable, eco-friendly activity that has many wonderful benefits, both for individual riders as well as for the City overall,” Mayor Purzycki continued. “It promotes a healthy, active lifestyle and helps remind us to be good stewards of the environment. And for a city as small as Wilmington, biking is also a practical means of transportation. The opening of the Jack Markell Trail between the Wilmington Riverfront and Old New Castle has been a marvelous addition to the city as we continue to look for ways to improve our cycling infrastructure.”
 
The three-day weekend of events in Wilmington coincides with National Bike Month, which has been commemorated by bike enthusiasts, municipalities and community organizations each May since 1956.  The order of events is as follows:

Friday, May 17
National Bike-to-Work Day will be celebrated with five guided rides into the city, ending at H.B. DuPont Plaza at the intersection of Delaware Avenue and North Washington Street. Visit this link to check out the routes. Each ride begins at 7:45 a.m. and ends with a reception at the plaza from 8 to 9:30 a.m. The event is FREE, but registration is required. All registered participants will receive free refreshments and a free t-shirt PLUS a complimentary drink ticket to be redeemed at the Wilmington Grand Prix Monkey Hill Time Trial in Brandywine Park on Friday evening.
 
The Wilmington Grand Prix kicks off Friday evening at 5 p.m. with the Monkey Hill Time Trial, a 3.2-mile race against the clock through Wilmington’s Brandywine Park.  The family-friendly event will feature live music by Element K, craft beer, food trucks and more. For more information about the Wilmington Grand Prix, visit: www.wilmgrandprix.com.
 
Saturday, May 18
Grand Prix Festivities move downtown where two amateur bicycle races and a street festival will be held on Market Street. The amateur races begin at 11 a.m., including the City Youth Championship at 12:15 p.m., and culminate with the Women’s Pro and Men’s Pro races that afternoon.
 
Urban Bike Project celebrates the completion of its renovated shop interior at 1500 North Walnut Street with a Grand Reopening from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The FREE event will include live music, food and drink (including Dogfish Head beer and a special UBP roast from Brandywine Coffee Roasters), as well as a bike sale featuring a 10% discount on all used bicycles.
 
Sunday, May 19
The Grand Prix continues with the return of the 8th Annual Governor’s Ride and the 7th Annual Delaware Gran Fondo. Last year’s Gran Fondo drew cyclists from 15 states and four countries who took a scenic tour through the Brandywine Valley and some of Delaware’s most-prized cultural attractions.

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